February 21, 2020 $1.25 Canadian Publications Agreement No. 40727545

Lakefield Homecoming

August 7th - 9th, 2020

Covering the East Kawarthas

 

 

Nicola and Grant Hedrich having a blast catching fish “ice fishing” outside the BCC as part the of Blizzard Fest.

Vanessa Stark

BY MARNIE CLEMENT

Two local organizations previously turned down by Trent Lakes Municipal Council were each given $1,000 by council this week.

The Kawartha Land Trust (KLT) and the Kawartha Lake Stewards Association (KLSA) will each receive a grant of $1,000,  The KLT grant will be used for maintenance and snowplowing of the new parking lot that was built at the John Earle Chase Memorial Park located just north of Gannons Narrows.  The park is operated through a partnership agreement between Parks Canada, the KLT and the municipality.

The KLSA grant will be used by the organization, which is run by volunteers, for water monitoring and reporting activities.

Council voted to give grants to 10 other local organizations at a special council meeting on February 3, 2020.

Councillor Kim Letto, who introduced the motion to provide the two organizations with grants, said that their omission at the earlier meeting was “an oversight.”

 

 

BY MARNIE CLEMENT

Trent Lakes Municipal Council passed a budget that decreases the municipal tax rate by .03 per cent for 2020 at Tuesday’s regular meeting.

Despite the rate reduction, the amount of tax will increase by $51.11 for the average homeowner because assessment values have increased..  The average value for a single family detached home or seasonal dwellings on water is $399,224.97 for 2020, up from $385,892.83 in 2019.

This means the average homeowner will pay $1,541.81 in taxes this year.  The breakdown is $141 for administration, $298 for protective services, $551 for roads, bridges and culverts, $177 for fire and emergency planning, $113 for parks and recreation and $259 for capital programs such as infrastructure and costs for fleet replacement.

Financial pressures on the municipality for 2020 include work required on Beaver Lake Road, reconstruction of 1.9 km of Sumcot Drive, replacement of two tandem trucks, two new pick up trucks for recreation and facilities and a new pumper truck for Fire Station 2,

CAO/Treasurer Donna Teggart told council that areas where there are savings this year include a reduction in building maintenance and cleaning costs for the fire department as the staff will be doing that work, reduced cold mix patching costs because of annual scheduled surface treat work has resulted in a better road network and lower operational costs.

Costs for the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) have also decreased by $43,130 (2.53 per cent.  Teggart said the decrease is because the number of calls for OPP service are down and a new five-year policing contract that was signed in 2019.

Municipal revenues are from tax which makes up 62 per cent of all money coming in.  The other 38 per cent is revenue from grants, reserves and user fees.

Of the tax revenue, 95 per cent comes from residential taxes paid for homes and cottages.

 

 

 

Trent Lakes reconsiders grants

Peterborough Public Health seeks municipal support

Trent Lakes 2020 Budget

In this week's print edition

Theft at Home Hardware

Bait & Tackle Shop lost in fire

Premiere Studio of Dance looking to rebuild

Camp Kawartha offers outdoor education

Trent-Severn National Historical Site survey

Christmas in the Village a huge success

Local architect designs new forensics building

Family Ice Fishing Day at Rotary Park

 

Special Features:

 

Wedding Wishes

 

Regular Content:

 

Editorial by Terry McQuitty

Accidental Columnist by Marnie Clement

Bird Column by Rachel Lancashire

Mature Living by Terri Williams Kinghorn

Book Review by Barry Mutter

@yourlibrary by Kacie Gardiner

Story Time at the Buckhorn Library

Golden Years Club Update

Horoscopes

Sudoku

 

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BY TERRY MCQUITTY

Selwyn mayor Andy Mitchell, Chair of Board of Health and Dr. Rosana Salvaterra, Medical Officer of Health appeared before Douro-Dummer council on Tuesday evening with a request for support. Peterborough Public Health has created a report titled the Modernization of Public Health in Ontario and is looking for the municpalities within Peterborough County to support this paper.

Mitchell gave a little background on the report explaining that the provincial government proposed major changes to the Ontario Public Health system in the April 2019 budget. These changes included the amalgamation of 35 boards of health into ten regional entities as well as changing the funding model which would see municiplities on the hook for substantially more funding.

Following the initial announcement in April of last year the Ford government saw the need to engage in more public consultation. The province appointed a special advisor  in October of 2019, released a discussion paper and accepted input with a deadline of February 10 which was later extended to March 31, 2020, consultation  sessions across the province and finally a one time grant to municipalities to make up for money no longer offered by the province.

Salvaterra explained that the province said it would enter these consultations with no preconcieved notions, but they province did say that it intends to amalgamate certain “units”.

It was pointed out that the ministry of health had identified some issues that would detract from the original plans. The ministry identified issues are as follows:

1.Some boards of health have insufficient capacity (human and fiscal resources), especially where health units are too small. Salvaterra said that Peterborough would be affected by this as they fit this category.

2.There are barriers to collaborating effectively leading to misalignment of health, social and other services;

3.Local public health agencies are poorly coordinated, leading to duplication of effort;

4.There is inconsistencyin how prioritie sare set and decisions are made with respect to public health programs and services.

The report recommends eight principals of reform which include:

1.The enhancement of health promotion and disease prevention must be the primary priority of any changes undertaken;

2.Investments in public health must be recognized as a critical strategy in reducing the need for hallway health care;

3.Any consolidation of public health units should reflect a community of interests which include distinguishing between rural and urban challenges and facilitates the meaningful participation of First Nations;

4.Adequate provincial funding is necessary to ensure effective health promotion and prevention activities in Ontario. Funding should be predictable and consider factors such as equity, population demographics and density, rural/urban mix and increase to meet new demands;

5.Local funding needs to consider a municipality’s ability to pay in the context of the broad range of changes in funding arrangements between the Province and municipalities;

6.As public health is a joint municipal-provincial venture, its governance structure must provide accountability to the local councils that are required to fund local public health agencies;

7.Changes undertaken need to be evidenced based and not ideologically driven; and,

8.Change must be driven from the bottom up, in a process that respects both Provincial and local interests and facilitates genuine collaboration. Change management impact must be acknowledged in this process.

The report lists the following as the key issues that must be dealt with moving forward:

1.The enhancement of health promotion and disease prevention must be the primary priority of any changes undertaken;

2.Investments in public health must be recognized as a critical strategy in reducing the need for hallway health care;

3.Any consolidation of public health units should reflect a community of interests which include distinguishing between rural and urban challenges and facilitates the meaningful participation of First Nations;

4.Adequate provincial funding is necessary to ensure effective health promotion and prevention activities in Ontario. Funding should be predictable and consider factors such as equity, population demographics and density, rural/urban mix and increase to meet new demands;

5.Local funding needs to consider a municipality’s ability to pay in the context of the broad range of changes in funding arrangements between the Province and municipalities;

6.As public health is a joint municipal-provincial venture, its governance structure must provide accountability to the local councils that are required to fund local public health agencies;

7.Changes undertaken need to be evidenced based and not ideologically driven; and,

8.Change must be driven from the bottom up, in a process that respects both Provincial and local interests and facilitates genuine collaboration. Change management impact must be acknowledged in this process.

The report concludes with three key asks to local councils and they are as follows:

1.Support the Board of Health’s position paper

2.Make the financial case to the Province

3.Provide ideas

Deputy mayor Karl Moher said we talked about amalgamation, should we look at Hastings and North Cumberland? Can we get ahead of this?

Mitchell responded that the Peterborough Health is not opposed to amalgamation, there are ideas that make sense, but they will have to wait and see what the province has to say.

Councillor Shelagh Landsmann moved to receive the delegation. No motion to support the report was made on Tuesday evening.

 

 

Unheralded the documentary

"Unheralded" chronicles a week in the life of "The Lakefield Herald", a local newspaper published in Lakefield, Ontario. Whether writing about dog shows and 100th birthdays, or telling stories of citizen opposition and community loss - local news reporters have a difficult job, especially when the readers are their neighbours. "Unheralded" is an NFB-TVO Calling Card production.